5 Ways to Handle a High-Energy Dog? Petscareer 2022

Ways to Handle a High-Energy Dog. When it comes to dogs, there are many different types of breeds and personalities. Some dogs are quite mellow and relaxed, while others have so much energy that they can’t help but run around and play all day long. While high-energy dogs can be lots of fun, they can also be hard to handle and tire easily from too much activity. If you find yourself constantly struggling to keep your dog calm, here are five ways to help them become more low-key in the future so you can both enjoy the relationship you have together without feeling exhausted all the time!

Fortunately for Caplan, she found nose work, an activity that assists canines with finding birch, anise, and clove smells. Canines start by finding a fragrance coordinated with food covered in one of twelve or so boxes. Finally, they work up to vehicles, rooms, and outside conditions. Caplan takes her canines to class one time every week, practices at home, and takes them to nose work primers.

“It’s kind of saved me,” she says, “since it gives them an assignment, and they love it.” You can see a video of Walter, in actuality, under.

If you can’t find a close-by showing office, Caplan recommends Fenzi Dog Sports Academy for online classes.

Ways to Handle a High-Energy Dog
Ways to Handle a High-Energy Dog

Use A Leash While Walking

In a sense, dogs are like small children. They will explore and investigate everything they can find and if your dog is a high energy, he’ll especially be curious about new people, places, and things. A leash is essential if you have a high-energy dog because it helps you control where they go and how close they get to others. This simple step will help ensure your dog doesn’t end up scaring or knocking over other people when you’re out with them.

Ways to Handle a High-Energy Dog
Ways to Handle a High-Energy Dog

Take Time To Build A Bond With The Dog

When it comes to high-energy dogs, what you see isn’t always a big issue. Sure, your dog may run around like crazy and seem restless, but as long as he’s still willing to listen when you need him to do something or respond when you call his name, he may be just fine with all that running around. And in fact, if that level of energy is completely normal for your dog—like it is for many puppies—it can actually mean he’s well exercised and happy. Regardless of how high-energy your dog seems by nature or by design, however, there are ways to help them burn off their excess energy. Read on for some great tips.

Ways to Handle a High-Energy Dog
Ways to Handle a High-Energy Dog

Teach Your Dog Tricks

Having a high-energy dog can be exhausting, especially if you’re trying to work or spend time with family and friends. Dogs often burn off excess energy through playtime—or destructive chewing. Teaching your pup some simple tricks can help wear them out without spending money on a pricey dog walker or trainer. Whether you’re interested in teaching your dog how to sit, fetch, roll over, or shake, there are tutorials for nearly every trick you could imagine online! Plus, if all else fails, it’s still fun for both of you to learn a new skill together.

Consistency Counts

With high-energy dogs, consistency is key. You need to be equally consistent with your pet, but also firm and clear about your boundaries. So as much as you want your high-energy dog’s energy level to settle down, it might be just as important for you and other members of your household to remain calm. Paying attention to one another will help you become more aware of what makes your dog happiest. And once you figure that out, take advantage of those moments by trying to turn them into rewards for good behavior or quiet moments in which everyone can relax together without stress.

Ways to Handle a High-Energy Dog
Ways to Handle a High-Energy Dog
Exercise Properly

When you’re starting a new dog training routine, it can be difficult for both you and your pup. Dogs with higher energy levels tend to need more intense exercise; experts recommend anywhere from 30 minutes of activity for an adult medium-sized dog per day, up to two hours. Choose high-intensity activities like jogging, running, or hiking as opposed to slow walks. When going out on walks, keep in mind that dogs with high energy often have difficulty focusing on commands while they’re being distracted by other dogs or things along their walk route; if your pooch is easily distracted, take them on quiet streets where there are fewer distractions around them.

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